Why it’s time to stop eating king size chocolates

Are you a fan of super-size chocolate bars and even king size ones? We agree, these bars attract increased attention, but the trouble is that they are much more critical to your health than the chocolates of standard size and shape. This is increasingly being discussed by European doctors, urging us to be more attentive to the choice of dessert. If you do not give up pleasures for good, at least, do not take the larger version of your favorite treat from the shelf.

The National Health Service of England (NHS England), for example, already now states that “size plus” chocolate bars should be excluded from sale in canteens, vending machines and stores in hospitals. That is because sweets and chocolate, sold in medical institutions, according to the department representatives, should contain 250 calories or less.

Doctors put forward other requirements for “fast food”, which will be useful for everyone who eats food from vending machines from time to time or on a regular basis:

  • ready-made sandwich should not contain more than 400 calories (attention to the packaging!),
  • dressed salads should contain no more than 5 grams of saturated fat per 100 grams of the ready dish,

drinks should contain less than 5 grams of sugar for every 100 milliliters.
Based on the assessment of the same NHS England, about 54% of hospital staff is overweight or obese. A series of studies show that giant chocolate bars are to blame for this. Of course, usual-size chocolate bars always lose, compared to bigger versions.

“We stepped up to tackle the problem that causes the epidemic of obesity, preventable diabetes, caries, heart disease and cancer,” says NHS spokesman Simon Stevens in an interview with BBC. “We want to offer people healthier food instead of sweet snacks saturated with calories. First of all, it concerns the hospital staff, patients and visitors”.

Diabetes-fighting societies took the initiative with particular enthusiasm. “We really want to see how all this will work in practice. However, this is only one part of the puzzle, if we talk about the fight against obesity as a whole. That is, we need to go further, much further, so we call on the government to tighten restrictions on marketing of kids-oriented unhealthy food, and to stop the rise in prices for healthier foods,” says Helen Dickens from Diabetes UK.

Will this initiative reach the US or Canada? It’s a question difficult to answer. If it ever does, we have plenty of time to get ready for it, and to buy your favorite king size chocolate bar for the last time and to bid farewell of it forever.

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